Mother Magdalen Taylor and Catholic Brentford

Mother Magdalen Taylor

Mother Magdalen Taylor

7.30pm, Monday 20 October 2014, at the Chiswick Memorial Club, Bourne Place, London W4

An illustrated talk by Paul Shaw, central archivist for the Poor Servants of the Mother of God Sisters at the Convent in Brentford Butts since 2001. The talk will focus on Mother Magdalen Taylor (1832-1900), the founder of the order in Brentford, whose interesting life included service as a nurse with Florence Nightingale in the Crimea.

Syon Park, the Duke of Northumberland & the Civil War in Brentford & Chiswick

A True and Perfect Relation
7.30pm, Monday 15 September 2014 at the Chiswick Memorial Club, Bourne Place, London W4

An illustrated talk by Howard Simmons, a Hounslow Heritage Guide, Syon House Guide and board member of the Battlefield Trust.

Howard will describe the role of the Duke of Northumberland and his home, Syon House, during the English Civil Wars with particular emphasis on the Battle of Brentford and the follow up engagement at Turnham Green in November 1642. He will explore the themes of loyalty and betrayal, warfare, looting and damage in our locality, and consider the artistic endeavour of Van Dyck and Peter Lely before asking about one of history’s great “what ifs?” that might have seen a different outcome to the Civil War.

Remembering the Chiswick V2, 8 Sept 2014

Rex Carter at the memorial, 8 Sept 2014

The wreath, 8 Sept 2014

The wreath, 8 Sept 2014

Every September since 2004 the Society has quietly laid flowers at the V2 memorial in Staveley Road. On the 60th anniversary of the first V2 landing in Britain in that year, we worked with members of the Battlefields Trust’s London branch to create a memorial to those who died in Chiswick on that occasion.

As this year marks 70 years since the V2 landed, we invited others to join us when we laid our wreath. Amongst those who came was Rex Carter, one of our members. He recalled that as a boy living in Flanders Mansions he had heard the huge bang of the V2 explosion; once we knew of his direct memory of the event, we handed him the wreath and invited him to place it before the memorial.

Rosemary Clarke

Rosemary Clarke

Rosemary Clarke, aged 3, died in her cot in a front bedroom at number 1 Staveley Road. According to her slightly older brother, who survived, she was suffocated by the blast but had no sign of injury on her body.

Ada & William Harrison, Chiswick V2

Ada & William Harrison

Ada Harrison of number 3 Staveley Road died in the blast; she and her husband, William, ran three confectionery and newsagents’ shops in Chiswick, one on the corner of Park Road by Chiswick Station. Her name appears in the Roll of Honour of the Civilian War Dead 1939-1945 compiled by the Imperial War Graves Commission and placed in Westminster Abbey. Ten people were seriously wounded, amongst them William Harrison, who died soon afterwards.

Sapper Bernard Browning

Sapper Bernard Browning

Sapper Bernard Browning, whose family lived in Elmwood Road, was on leave. He was on his way to Chiswick station, to travel to visit his girlfriend, when he was killed by the blast. He was buried in his family’s plot in the cemetery down the road. The white headstone marks this out as a war grave because he died while on active service.

Find out more about the Chiswick V2 here